Sweet n Condensed Keaton

9 Jul 2014

owlturdcomix:

We go forward.

6 Jul 2014

fangirwin:

sleepy-se7en:

h-ound:

awwww-cute:

Baby sea turtle swimming

or is it flying through the snow

definitely swimming lmao

it’s fucking flying through the snow like a radiant flying turtle shut up

fangirwin:

sleepy-se7en:

h-ound:

awwww-cute:

Baby sea turtle swimming

or is it flying through the snow

definitely swimming lmao

it’s fucking flying through the snow like a radiant flying turtle shut up

6 Jul 2014

weloveshortvideos:

How best friends fall down

Vine by David Lopez

17 May 2014

cypher2:

ESPN Films and ESPN W | Nine for IX “Branded” | for saveitlikesolo

I think without question women who aspire to be athletes, who want to play sports, are better off today than they were thirty years ago. I think it really encouraged young girls to go out there and aspire to their dreams and try to reach their goals. 

But despite Title IX, women have really gained very little at the professional sports level over time. 

It’s a cultural issue. It’s not just a women in sport issue. As a culture we have to look at all of the messages we send out on a daily basis about what we think is important. I think we’ve made a lot of progress. But I think we have a lot of progress to make.

25 Feb 2014

fuckyeahsexeducation:

TW: rape
pepperonistark:

sorayachemaly:

From CNN: List: States where rape is most common 
“Rape is least frequent (or is least frequently reported) in New Jersey. The state with the second-highest rate of reported rape, behind Alaska, is South Dakota, with a rate of 70 per 100,000.”

#(points to native populations in south dakota and alaska)   #(points to rate of sexual assault against native women)   #(points angrily) (via bringinglexiback)


(map of Native American and Alaskan Native populations in 2008)

fuckyeahsexeducation:

TW: rape

pepperonistark:

sorayachemaly:

From CNN: List: States where rape is most common 

Rape is least frequent (or is least frequently reported) in New Jersey. The state with the second-highest rate of reported rape, behind Alaska, is South Dakota, with a rate of 70 per 100,000.”

#(points to native populations in south dakota and alaska)   #(points to rate of sexual assault against native women)   #(points angrily) (via bringinglexiback)

(map of Native American and Alaskan Native populations in 2008)

20 Feb 2014

drst:

chakrabot:

maja-stina:

fandomsandfeminism:

generalmaluga:

albinwonderland:

fandomsandfeminism:

betterthanabortion:

"My body, my choice" only makes sense when someone else’s life isn’t at stake.

Fun fact: If my younger sister was in a car accident and desperately needed a blood transfusion to live, and I was the only person on Earth who could donate blood to save her, and even though donating blood is a relatively easy, safe, and quick procedure no one can force me to give blood. Yes, even to save the life of a fully grown person, it would be ILLEGAL to FORCE me to donate blood if I didn’t want to.
See, we have this concept called “bodily autonomy.” It’s this….cultural notion that a person’s control over their own body is above all important and must not be infringed upon. 
Like, we can’t even take LIFE SAVING organs from CORPSES unless the person whose corpse it is gave consent before their death. Even corpses get bodily autonomy. 
To tell people that they MUST sacrifice their bodily autonomy for 9 months against their will in an incredibly expensive, invasive, difficult process to save what YOU view as another human life (a debatable claim in the early stages of pregnancy when the VAST majority of abortions are performed) is desperately unethical. You can’t even ask people to sacrifice bodily autonomy to give up organs they aren’t using anymore after they have died. 
You’re asking people who can become pregnant to accept less bodily autonomy than we grant to dead bodies. 

reblogging for commentary 

But, assuming the mother wasn’t raped, the choice to HAVE a baby and risk sacrificing their “bodily autonomy” is a choice that the mother made. YOu don’t have to have sex with someone. Cases of rape aside, it isn’t ethical to say abortion is justified. The unborn baby has rights, too. 

First point: Bodily autonomy can be preserved, even if another life is dependent on it. See again the example about the blood donation. 
And here’s another point: When you say that “rape is the exception” you betray something FUNDAMENTALLY BROKEN about your own argument.
Because a fetus produced from sexual assault is biologically NO DIFFERENT than a fetus produced from consensual sex. No difference at all.
If one is alive, so is the other. If one is a person, so is the other. If one has a soul, then so does the other. If one is a little blessing that happened for a reason and must be protected, then so is the other. 
When you say that “Rape is the exception” what you betray is this: It isn’t about a life. This isn’t about the little soul sitting inside some person’s womb, because if it was you wouldn’t care about HOW it got there, only that it is a little life that needs protecting.
When you say “rape is the exception” what you say is this: You are treating pregnancy as a punishment. You are PUNISHING people who have had CONSENSUAL SEX but don’t want to go through a pregnancy. People who DARED to have consensual sex without the goal of procreation in mind, and this is their “consequence.” 
And that is gross. 

This has been added to since I last saw it, so reblogging again.

Busted wide open.

Every terrible forced birther argument smashed apart in a few simple paragraphs.

drst:

chakrabot:

maja-stina:

fandomsandfeminism:

generalmaluga:

albinwonderland:

fandomsandfeminism:

betterthanabortion:

"My body, my choice" only makes sense when someone else’s life isn’t at stake.

Fun fact: If my younger sister was in a car accident and desperately needed a blood transfusion to live, and I was the only person on Earth who could donate blood to save her, and even though donating blood is a relatively easy, safe, and quick procedure no one can force me to give blood. Yes, even to save the life of a fully grown person, it would be ILLEGAL to FORCE me to donate blood if I didn’t want to.

See, we have this concept called “bodily autonomy.” It’s this….cultural notion that a person’s control over their own body is above all important and must not be infringed upon. 

Like, we can’t even take LIFE SAVING organs from CORPSES unless the person whose corpse it is gave consent before their death. Even corpses get bodily autonomy. 

To tell people that they MUST sacrifice their bodily autonomy for 9 months against their will in an incredibly expensive, invasive, difficult process to save what YOU view as another human life (a debatable claim in the early stages of pregnancy when the VAST majority of abortions are performed) is desperately unethical. You can’t even ask people to sacrifice bodily autonomy to give up organs they aren’t using anymore after they have died. 

You’re asking people who can become pregnant to accept less bodily autonomy than we grant to dead bodies. 

reblogging for commentary 

But, assuming the mother wasn’t raped, the choice to HAVE a baby and risk sacrificing their “bodily autonomy” is a choice that the mother made. YOu don’t have to have sex with someone. Cases of rape aside, it isn’t ethical to say abortion is justified. The unborn baby has rights, too. 

First point: Bodily autonomy can be preserved, even if another life is dependent on it. See again the example about the blood donation. 

And here’s another point: When you say that “rape is the exception” you betray something FUNDAMENTALLY BROKEN about your own argument.

Because a fetus produced from sexual assault is biologically NO DIFFERENT than a fetus produced from consensual sex. No difference at all.

If one is alive, so is the other. If one is a person, so is the other. If one has a soul, then so does the other. If one is a little blessing that happened for a reason and must be protected, then so is the other. 

When you say that “Rape is the exception” what you betray is this: It isn’t about a life. This isn’t about the little soul sitting inside some person’s womb, because if it was you wouldn’t care about HOW it got there, only that it is a little life that needs protecting.

When you say “rape is the exception” what you say is this: You are treating pregnancy as a punishment. You are PUNISHING people who have had CONSENSUAL SEX but don’t want to go through a pregnancy. People who DARED to have consensual sex without the goal of procreation in mind, and this is their “consequence.” 

And that is gross. 

This has been added to since I last saw it, so reblogging again.

Busted wide open.

Every terrible forced birther argument smashed apart in a few simple paragraphs.

19 Feb 2014

skunkbear:

Randall Munroe of xkcd put together an amusing/fascinating set of gifs showing the relative frequencies of various events.  This is just a small sample - see them all here.

19 Feb 2014

14 Feb 2014

(Source: prismcess)

8 Feb 2014

ravenclawcore:

badger-in-a-sodastream:

i-have-been-johnlocked:

avalonroselin:

abunchofassholes:

thisiswhiteculture:

sheishurr:

welp


and if any of you white people respond with “wait but I didn’t do that. that was in the past”
i need you to check your privilege
and then drink bleach if you think your hands aren’t dirty

They’re not.
Guilt doesn’t transfer from generation to generation. I am not magically accountable for something my great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great grandfather MIGHT have done. Also;
>social justice blogger>telling people to kill themselves

I love that there’s a blog called “this is white culture” that is solely devoted to bad things white people did, not their cultures at all.  So I guess I can make a blog called “this is black culture” and post gang and crime records and that’s 100% okay.  Or “this is Muslim culture” and make it all about terrorism.
But wait, you cry.  Not all black people are criminals and not all Muslims are terrorists.  That’s unfair!  And racist!
WELL GOLLY GEE DO YOU THINK SO?  Because saying that all white people are responsible for the Atlantic slave trade sounds pretty racist to me, given that, you know, that was between the African slaveholders and the British and Americans and had absolutely nothing whatsoever to do with my ancestors, who were incredibly poor farmers and serfs from Ireland and Lithuania who had to flee to America at around the turn of the century (by which time slavery had already been abolished in the US) because they were being treated like slaves.  Even if they had been living in America at the time when slavery was legal they wouldn’t have been able to afford a slave; in fact they probably would have been working with them in the fields and treated about the same, since the first slaves in America were actually white serfs.  But please, tell me more about how dirty my hands are because of circumstances surrounding my birth that I could not control and continue to treat me differently based on the color of my skin without actually knowing anything about my heritage, I’m sure that isn’t racist at all!

*slow clap*

*stands up and wipes tear*

*crowd goes wild* 

My ancestors were also Irish, and I want to make a point that that is no excuse to not check your privilege. Yes, the Irish were brought over and sold as slaves, yes Ireland was colonized, the language, art, and culture made illegal, and yes in the mid 1600’s almost half the population was wiped out via genocide and exporting people as slaves. BUT the Irish BECAME white by being hyper racist towards black workers in factories AT THE TURN of the century. So while we weren’t responsible for the slave trade (though we were a part of it) we have still gotten and retained white privilege partially through racism and partially through our skin color. THEREFORE, it is necessary to continue to check your privilege as you gain benefits for being white despite being Irish or Lithuanian.

ravenclawcore:

badger-in-a-sodastream:

i-have-been-johnlocked:

avalonroselin:

abunchofassholes:

thisiswhiteculture:

sheishurr:

welp

image

and if any of you white people respond with “wait but I didn’t do that. that was in the past”

i need you to check your privilege

and then drink bleach if you think your hands aren’t dirty

They’re not.

Guilt doesn’t transfer from generation to generation. I am not magically accountable for something my great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great grandfather MIGHT have done. Also;

>social justice blogger
>telling people to kill themselves

I love that there’s a blog called “this is white culture” that is solely devoted to bad things white people did, not their cultures at all.  So I guess I can make a blog called “this is black culture” and post gang and crime records and that’s 100% okay.  Or “this is Muslim culture” and make it all about terrorism.

But wait, you cry.  Not all black people are criminals and not all Muslims are terrorists.  That’s unfair!  And racist!

WELL GOLLY GEE DO YOU THINK SO?  Because saying that all white people are responsible for the Atlantic slave trade sounds pretty racist to me, given that, you know, that was between the African slaveholders and the British and Americans and had absolutely nothing whatsoever to do with my ancestors, who were incredibly poor farmers and serfs from Ireland and Lithuania who had to flee to America at around the turn of the century (by which time slavery had already been abolished in the US) because they were being treated like slaves.  Even if they had been living in America at the time when slavery was legal they wouldn’t have been able to afford a slave; in fact they probably would have been working with them in the fields and treated about the same, since the first slaves in America were actually white serfs.  But please, tell me more about how dirty my hands are because of circumstances surrounding my birth that I could not control and continue to treat me differently based on the color of my skin without actually knowing anything about my heritage, I’m sure that isn’t racist at all!

*slow clap*

*stands up and wipes tear*

*crowd goes wild* 

My ancestors were also Irish, and I want to make a point that that is no excuse to not check your privilege. Yes, the Irish were brought over and sold as slaves, yes Ireland was colonized, the language, art, and culture made illegal, and yes in the mid 1600’s almost half the population was wiped out via genocide and exporting people as slaves. BUT the Irish BECAME white by being hyper racist towards black workers in factories AT THE TURN of the century. So while we weren’t responsible for the slave trade (though we were a part of it) we have still gotten and retained white privilege partially through racism and partially through our skin color. THEREFORE, it is necessary to continue to check your privilege as you gain benefits for being white despite being Irish or Lithuanian.

7 Feb 2014

justalonelyintrovert:

jpbrammer:

Yes, yes, legalize gay, sure. But have you ever considered weaponizing gay?

Actually didn’t Greeks back in the day use gays to their advantage. If you go to war and you’re fighting next to your lover you’re going to fight so much better because there’s so much more at stake. 

The Celts were pretty into it too: The Greek philosopher Posidonius, who traveled into Gaul to investigate the truth of the stories told about the Celtic tribes, put it rather bluntly: “The Gaulish men prefer to have sex with each other.”Roman and Greek accounts both mention Celtic warriors who were deeply insulted if their offers of homosexual sex were refused.

-http://www.paganachd.com/faq/ethics.html#queerqueerqueer

(Source: johnpaulbrammer)

2 Feb 2014

oddevenstar:

Lyrics:

I never left the shire in the flesh
‘til I saw bilbo disappear at the party
and I am proud of my address
I’m a Baggins, Baggins of Bagend

But everyday’s like
Gold ring, greybeard, trippin on the mushrooms
Blood-mad Nazgul trashin the hotel room
we don’t care
We go to Rivendell across the stream
and everybody’s like
Mountains, dwarf mines, presents from the elf queen
Rowboats, Rock paths, Gollum on a rope leash
we don’t care
yeah were simply gonna walk there

‘cuz were going to Mordor
Took runs in my blood
This kind of quest just aint our part
we are short and stout of heart
Sauron won’t be my ruler
Buckleberry Ferry, Brie
and baby the ring
Won’t get the best of me

2 Feb 2014

qbits:

thepeoplesrecord:

Going beyond the Western gender binary - unlearning our backward cultural conditioning 

In Western colonial society (which dominates many aspects of the globalized, capitalist world today) we operate under the presumption that there are only two genders, male and female. But gender is a social construction. One’s options for what gender they identify with are shaped by the culture they are born into. Biological factors are most-often the primary driving forces that choose among the available socially-constructed gender categories.

Cultures around the world have different ways of talking about, thinking about, and identifying gender. It’s often a challenge for (particularly cis-sexual) Westerns to think about other ways gender can be socially constructed. Westerns have the false equivalency of gender and sex drilled into their eternal psyche from the time they are very young, and re-enforced through examples in popular culture. There is no biological reality to gender. Many Westerners have the bizarre belief that one’s XY-sex-determination should also inform one’s gender identity, a socially constructed role in society.

In some cultures, there is no distinction made between gender and sexual orientation and the same can be said for sexual orientation - our culture socially-constructs the options and our biology helps us identify which socially-constructed option feels most ‘right’ and best resonates with us.

I’ve attached some photos to offer some examples of non-colonial, non-Western construction of gender. They’ve all been uploaded onto our Facebook page photostream in case you’d like to ‘like’ or ‘share’ them there. There are literally hundreds of ‘third-gender’ identifying peoples around the world. The eight I’ve chosen are mostly examples I remember from some of my anthropology courses but if you google ‘third genders’ you can find many lists and examples.

Who cares? Why it matters.

The most obvious reason to care about the way our culture has constructed gender and sexual orientation is to deepen one’s capacity for solidarity with people who identify as transgender, transsexual, and others whose gender or sexual identity exists outside of binary Western culture.

But there are other reasons as well. Western culture’s binary nature often creates non-sensical, problematic binary identity constructions that are inherently problematic. For example, I believe that Western masculinity (dominance, aggression, lack of communication, lack of emotional expression, etc) is inherently problematic. I believe that to be the reason why most acts of large-scale-violence and terror are committed by men (see: 100% of the mass school shootings in the United States), and I believe it fosters a degree of internal misery within people who heavily adopt these particular ‘masculine’ traits.

In the age of information, and the age of global connectivity, there is no longer any reason (particularly for young people) to feel isolated or restricted to Western definitions of gender, sexual orientation and identity in general. I think the social ramifications of a generation where more and more people begin to identify outside of the gender binary would be tremendous, and I think we should all consider how we can unlearn our cultural conditioning to embrace other, perhaps less exploitative and dominating identities.

Background information on the identities depicted in the above images:

Hijras
Hijras are male-body-born, feminine-gender-identifying people who live in South Asia (mostly in India & Nepal). Many Hijras live in well-defined, organized, all-Hijra communities, led by a guru.

Although many Hijras identify as Muslim, many practice a form of syncretism that draws on multiple religions; seeing themselves to be neither men nor women, Hijras practice rituals for both men and women.

Hijras belong to a special caste. They are usually devotees of the mother goddess Bahuchara Mata, Lord Shiva, or both.

Nandi female husbands
Among the Nandi in Western Kenya, one social identity option for women is to become a female husband, and thus a man in society’s eyes. Female husbands are expected to become men and take on all of the social and cultural responsibilities of a man, including finding a wife to marry and passing on property to the next generation through marriage. Female husbands may have lived their lives as women and may even be married to a man, but once she becomes a female-husband, she is expected to be a man. Women married to female-husbands may have sex with single men uninterested in commitment in order to become pregnant, but the female-husband (who is often an older woman, often a widow) will father the child of said pregnancy and treat the child like her own.

Two-spirited people
Two-Spirit is an umbrella term sometimes used for what was once commonly known as ‘berdaches’, Indigenous North Americans who fulfill one of many mixed gender roles found traditionally among many Native Americans and Canadian First Nations communities. The term usually indicates a person whose body simultaneously manifests both a masculine and a feminine spirit. Male and female two-spirits have been “documented in over 130 tribes, in every region of North America.”

Travesti
In South America (with a large presence in Brazil), a travesti is a person who was assigned male at birth who has a feminine gender identity and is primarily sexually attracted to masculine men. Therefore, sometimes the distinction between gender identity and sexual orientation is not made. Travestis have been described as a third gender, but not all see themselves this way.Travestis often will begin taking female hormones and injecting silicone to enlargen their backsides as boys and continue the process into womanhood.

The work of cultural Anthropologist Don Kulick (a gay male by Western definitions) in Brazil demonstrated that gender construction in Brazil is binary (like Western gender construction), but unlike Western gender construction, instead of having a male-female binary, there is a male-notmale.

In this particular construction of gender:

  • Males include: men who have sex with women, men who have sex with Travestis but are never on the receiving end of anal sex, men who have sex with men but are never on the receiving end of anal sex.
  • Not-males include: women, men who receive anal sex from ‘male’ gay men or from Travestis.

Fa’afafine
Fa’afafine are the gender liminal, or third-gendered people of Samoa. A recognized and integral part of traditional Samoan culture, fa’afafine, born biologically male, embody both male and female gender traits. Their gendered behavior typically ranges from extravagantly feminine to mundanely masculine

Waria
Waria is a traditional third general role found in modern Indonesia. Additionally, the Bugis culture of Sulawesi (one of the four larger Sunda Islands of Indonesia) has been described as having three sexes (male, female and intersex) as well as five genders with distinct social roles.

Six Genders of old Israel
In the old Kingdom of Israel (1020–931 BCE) there were six officially recognized genders:

  • Zachar: male
  • Nekeveh: female
  • Androgynos: both male and female
  • Tumtum: gender neutral/without definite gender
  • Aylonit: female-to-male transgender people
  • Saris: male-to-female transgender people (often inaccurately translated as “eunuch”)

Kathoey (often called ‘ladyboys’)
Australian scholar of sexual politics in Thailand Peter Jackson’s work indicates that the term “kathoey” was used in pre-modern times to refer to intersexual people, and that the usage changed in the middle of the twentieth century to cover cross-dressing males, to create what is now a gender identity unique to Thailand. Thailand also has three identities related to female-bodied people: Tom, Dee, and heterosexual woman.

-Robert

Excellent overview of non-binary gender categories. Sadly, Western imperialism has all but extirpated many traditional concepts of non-dualistic sex and gender categories through residential schools and religious indoctrination. -Q

2 Feb 2014

wocinsolidarity:

gnomebriela:

Most important NFL commercial to date!

CHANGE THE MASCOT

Wow.

2 Feb 2014

birdsofrhiannon:

Brighid’s Kiss - Triniti

Gabbaim molta Bríde (I praise Brighid)

Ionmhain í le hÉirinn (Beloved of Ireland)

Ionhain le gach tír í (Beloved of all lands)

Molaímis go léir i (Let us all praise her)

Lóchrann geal na Laighneach

(The bright torch of Linster)

A’ soilsiú feadh na tíre (Shining throughout the land)

Cean ar óghaibh Éireann (The pride of all Irish women)

Ceann na mban ar míne

(The pride of women for gentleness)

Tig an geimhreadh dian dubh (Comes the hard dark winter)

A’ gearradh lena ghéire (Cutting with its severity)

Ach ar Lá ‘le Bríde (But on St. Brighids Day)

Gar dúinn earrach Éireann (The Irish spring is near to us)

Brighid of the sunrise

Rising in the morning

Rising with the springtime

Greening all the land

See you in the soft cloud

See you in the raindrop

See you in the winds of change

Blowing through the land

You the red eared white cow

Nourishing the people

Nourish now the hunger

Souls longing in our land

Bird that is unfolding

Now the time’s upon us

Only have we eyes to see

Your Epiphany

Gabbaim molta Bríde (I praise Brighid)

Ionmhain í le hÉirinn (Beloved of Ireland)

Ionhain le gach tír í (Beloved of all lands)

Molaímis go léir i (Let us all praise her)

Play count: 1,519